EQUERRY.COM   Logo  (tm)   Click Here for Equerry Menu
Breeding, Horses - Inspections

Expert Scott Hassler

Questions (For answers, scroll down or click on question)

Do you know of any classes or seminars that are available which discuss Bloodlines and how to select the best stallion for your mare?

I have a new TB mare with a clubby foot (farrier says it is a very mild grade). My vet has OK'd her for breeding and is not concerned. I would like to take her to a warmblood inspection. Can you tell me if this will go against her?

When you are judging in a Gelding Halter Class (Arabian) and the horse has a splint on a front leg, what percentage would you place on this as a fault or would you?

I have a Thoroughbred mare that I would like to have inspected in the AHS. How can I determine if my mare has the conformation and movement to even be considered for their studbooks?

Do you think it is a good idea that if a breed show had a class of unregistered horses that met the requirements except for blood line that would compete for smaller awards or honorary registration?


What is the advantage of having my horse go to a breed inspection?

If a registered appendix quarter horse stallion (his dam is a thoroughbred and his sire is a quarter horse) is bred to a registered quarter horse mare and a registered thoroughbred mare, how can the two offspring be registered?

I recently had my Holsteiner/TB mare approved by the American Warmblood Registry. Are there any benefits to having her branded?

Questions and Answers

Q: What is the advantage of having my horse go to a breed inspection?

A: The advantage of taking your horse to a breed inspection is to receive papers for your horse. This will establish and prove the pedigree. And, you will have information necessary for sales, breeding, records, or theft. Without papers, all these things are hard to achieve. 

 

Q: If a registered appendix quarter horse stallion (his dam is a thoroughbred and his sire is a quarter horse) is bred to a registered quarter horse mare and a registered thoroughbred mare, how can the two offspring be registered?

A: You need to contact the American Quarter Horse Registry (806-376-4811) or Foundation Quarter Horse Registry (970-522-7822) or The National Foundation Quarter Horse Association (541-426-4403). 

 

Q: I recently had my Holsteiner/TB mare approved by the American Warmblood Registry. Are there any benefits to having her branded?

A: There is probably not much benefit to having the mare branded, but definitely brand any offspring. 

 

Q: Do you think it is a good idea that if a breed show had a class of unregistered horses that met the requirements except for blood line that would compete for smaller awards or honorary registration?

A: I feel a class like this would be good recognition for these horses. There are many nice horses which are not registered and there is definitely a place for them in the show ring. So, yes, I support this idea. 

 

Q: I have a Thoroughbred mare that I would like to have inspected in the AHS. How can I determine if my mare has the conformation and movement to even be considered for their studbooks?

A: A good place to start is to send a video of your mare or show her to some experienced breeders for their input. 

 

Q: When you are judging in a Gelding Halter Class (Arabian) and the horse has a splint on a front leg, what percentage would you place on this as a fault or would you?

A: I am sorry, but I do not have experience with Arabian shows. My experience is with warmblood horses and there would not be any negative impact caused by a splint. 

 

Q: I have a new TB mare with a clubby foot (farrier says it is a very mild grade). My vet has OK'd her for breeding and is not concerned. I would like to take her to a warmblood inspection. Can you tell me if this will go against her?

A: Normally, it will not affect her inspection results. 

 

Q: Do you know of any classes or seminars that are available which discuss Bloodlines and how to select the best stallion for your mare?

A: There are no classes that I am aware of to help you with the stallion selection process. Hilltop Farm, periodically, holds Breeding Seminars and included is usually a small seminar discussing the best ways of choosing a stallion for your mare. Also, the Stallion Studbooks available from the registries is a good way to study bloodlines. 

 


This page, and all contents, are Copyright 2003 by Timon Inc.,
All Rights Reserved


[Home] [Back] [Breeding] [Sales] [Training] [Facilities] [Events] [News] [History] [InRhythm] [Map] [Equerry.com]